New Ways to End Your Diesel Engine Oil Burning Problem

New engine maintenance products are ending diesel engine oil burning problems, and avoiding costly repair expense.

Here’s an introduction to a new upgrade oil change method that reduces to a minimum, or ends oil loss – chemically. And this method works without need for sticky thick additives, or heavily thickened, once thin motor oil, or even a motor rebuild marketed for such problems.

If you own a diesel that has many years of use and one day started burning motor oil, you may have become alarmed by the development.

A quick check with friends suggest adding sticky additives, or a thicken oil, advertised for that purpose. These, you find, do not help much. Nor did such products end your motor’s power decline caused by oil burning negatives.

Before you learn of new oil burning control products that do work, here are things you should find helpful to ending your diesel engine oil burning condition.

Causes of diesel engine oil burning.

There are several reasons for your diesel oil burning problem and its oil consumption. Oil circulates to provide cooling and lubrication. One of the places oil goes to lube and cool is at your motor’s piston rings. Piston rings are loose-fitting bracelet-like parts that have two jobs.

  1. One function is to keep your motors 1500 degree combustion on top of your engine pistons so the forces of combustion push your engine down to spin the gears and wheels.
  2. The other function is to wipe away oil slashed on the pistons and their rings for needed lubrication.

Over time, piston rings become sticky, and along with wear spaces allow your crankcase motor oil to be sucked into the combustion cycle.

Between oil changes, oil loss can grow to a 4 quart replacement need. To much oil loss is no good for your engine, of course! That is your problem!

Remedies to end diesel oil burning problems.

A mechanic will suggest an engine overhaul, or a new motor, as choice for your oil consumption solution. Overhaul includes a rebuild of the upper part of your motor where engine valves are located and where engine valve slot wear can be a source of oil escape into the combustion area. And new piston rings and a clean up of related dirty conditions. The price is staggering! Cost can run from $3,000 to $7,000.

Another idea us mechanics have is to just replace your worn engine valve guides. And ignore replacement of new piston rings. The idea is that this repair would block your motor oil from going into the combustion area. That repair cost over $1500 up, and usually does not end oil burning.

How additives comes to the diesel oil burning problem rescue.

Since sticky piston rings are at fault, why not clean and free them with something called a tune up oil, with cleaning properties. Such tune-up oil products are not powerful enough to do so, and cannot operate at the 800 degree level of heat present around piston rings. They do not end the oil burn off problem.

Detergents are good cleaners, but have proved weak and unable to clean and free sticking piston rings and end oil’s escape.

Some people suggest using a sticky, honey-like product in hopes their glue-like nature can stop the flow of oil pass poor-functioning piston rings. These thick, gooey products do work when added to the motor’s oil. However, their larger molecule size and sticky nature may tend to slow or choke the oil’s ability to flow to the motors paper-thin size lube spaces. That is not good!

Chemical cleaners with anti-wear characteristics are gaining favor as these prove to clean and free sticky piston rings operating in near metal-melting temperatures. As their cleaning process continues, piston rings again flex outward in their up and down travel.

This renewed ring flexing ability again holds combustion above the piston area, and blocks oils escape to the burning process.

Further control to end a diesel engine oil burning problem is the method of cleaning of piston rings from both top and bottom of the piston. An advantage not gained by older oil additives.

Mega Power is an engine maintenance product brand using these chemical cleaners and conditioners that block oil’s escape, having none of the drawbacks older products sold have. Cost is under $100, not thousands. Their method’s success is a 2 step method installed for top of motor cleaning and freeing of your piston rings, This by addition to the fuel tank, air intake, and also your diesel motor oil side to free and clean. Driving does the actual work of freeing sticky piston rings. Any man or woman car owner can install the product – not just a mechanic. Learn more at http://www.auto-tune-up-and-repair-options.com/worn-motor-treatment.html

Nascar and the FX Race Technology

With the coming of engineering in the 21st century, reality television has made the front seat. As more and more proficiencies are formulated to make TV more interactive and advanced, sporting events are not left far behind. Nascar has started the race F/X technology, which has enhanced the interest further amongst TV audiences. Well, the technology was primitively started by FOX, which started trailing the hockey puck on national television. The trick was hot, and it became an instant hit.

Nascar brought in a synonymous technology to track their cars. But tracking a puck on a hockey field and tracking a car moving at 200 mph on a racing circuit are two different matters entirely. In Nascar, the commentators talk about a car and then the car is spotlighted with a glowing halo around it. It looks incredibly cool on television. The statistical information about the car is also presented just above the car.

The Technology Behind The Trick

Race F/X uses a wide range of parameters to showcase their final product. GPS orbiters form an integral component of the Race F/X technology. They are used to dig up the cars as they move around the circuit. They work in tandem with an earth-based navigation system. The tracking is so accurate that the car is tracked up to 20 millimeters distance from its real position.

In-car sensing elements in the cars also play a important part in enhancing the telecasted event. They help the GPS locate the cars and also help the networks to collect as much statistical data about the car as possible. The info is highly detailed and contains minute contingents like RPM, acceleration, speed, fuel consumption, and even braking. This information is gathered at the speed of ten times a second. So you can rest assured that it is most recent information that you see on top of your favorite Nascar cars.

You Will Be In It

The day is not very far when you will be able to control the Nascar cars race F/X technology and you will be able to select and highlight the car that you want to follow. This will be done with the help of a set top box, Nascar says. A video game variation of Nascar is also on the advent. This will enable you to race your own virtual car on the racing circuit with the greats of racing. So the days are not far when your own car will be racing beside Jeff Gordon and you will be in your living room all the time. Now isn’t that cool?

This will propel Nascar racing into a entirely different realm altogether. So, get ready, get set, GO!

Ending Your Car Engine Sludge Problem: Remedies That Work!

Engine sludge formation. Here is how it gets in your motor. And a new, inexpensive way to remove sludge without the need to take your motor apart.

When your car is about 4 years old and older. When your car’s odometer miles run pass 75,000 miles, sticky residues; leftovers from pass oil changes, begin to build faster and gum-up your motors piston rings. Your motors dirty piston rings are the primary cause of sludge formation. It happens in this way.

Your motor’s pistons have 3, 1/8 inch thick flexible, bracelet-like rings that have a springy nature to them. This keeps them ever expanding outward to provide blockage to keep your motor oil from escaping into the combustion cycle. And keep your fuels combustion gases totally above the piston. Its all needed to push your piston down, spinning gears, and wheels to propel you forward with zip and ease. Sludge begins when…

Engine sludge formation occurs when your piston rings allows those1500 degree combustion gases to slip pass them. This happens when dirty piston ring flexing outward action is slowed or reduced. A gap appears and with each burst of new combustion, little puffs of combustion escape pass your pistons and mix with your motor oil.

Well anyhow, there is always some escape of combustion, called blowby by us mechanics, even when your pistons rings work perfectly well. When rings and cylinder wear spaces allow more combustion to escape, you sludge your motor oil in a month of driving and you, by motor design vent it to the outside world. That is no good for air, water, old folks and children with breathing problems.

To prevent your cars heavily loaded combustion gases; containing a handful of suphurs, 5 gallons of raw gas, carbon black, and dozens of other negatives from being dumped into the air every 3000 miles of driving, a device is made to block its escape. Instead it is channel back into the combustion process. This is done by a thumb size check valve and hoses in a new motor sub-system called the positive crankcase ventilation system.

The positive crankcase ventilation system is overpowered by all that sticky, hot blowby and soon chokes down the blowby flow. When that happens sludge formation goes bonkers, like kids during their first year on the loose at college. Kids party. Sludge forms a 1/4 inch layer over every part. Kids know better. your motor does not!

The fix: Soon, your car starts losing its zip. It may consume motor oil. It may tap. Your exhaust smells worst than than your kids tennis after soccer practice. Friction wear is now running rampant. The usual fix is an overhaul at $3000 or more. Or a partial cleaning called an engine valve repair at up to $2000 in cost. Its a nasty, time consuming job to take apart and clean every part.

Engine Flushing. You may have read about all kinds of flushing methods from stepping on two frogs, to putting automatic transmission fluid and solvent in your motor to clean out the sludge. parts stores even sell engine flushes, which are solvents to do the job.

The bad thing about solvent motor flushes is they strip your pistons, bearings, valves, and gears of their vital oil lube film as they rinse away the sludge. And some of that sludge, during circulation, reform in all the wrong places. Usually blocking your motor’s oil pump pickup screen. About a week of driving after such a cleaning, your motor goes in convulsions. The mechanic say, in diagnosis,”It’s shot!”

New products to safely remove sludge using anti-wear cleaners are what is needed, if engine sludge is your motor’s problem. A leader in the field for internal engine cleaning and sludge removal with engine restorative ingredients is Mega Power. The Mega Power Sludge Removing Worn Motor Treatment is fast, and takes less than a hour. Mega Power is safe because it has friction reducers that lube even without the presence of oil. and it removes sludge over a 6000 miles time span. Instant restorative power results. Cost is under $100 – not $3000. And you can install the treatment yourself. Nothing to take apart. Driving does the cleaning. You can learn more and get ordering info at:

Autocross Buying Guide – Select the Right Car

In my experience, autocross can be a very fun and exciting sport. I have participated in several events in my local area. I found the hobby to be very addictive as well.

Out of all my other hobbies, I think this one is the best “bang for the buck” as far as thrills go with your car. Everybody can participate. Every car (some clubs have exceptions to this though like no SUV’s, no Trucks) can race. The nice thing about this kind of race is that you are competing against others in your class usually defined by the SCCA, however, you are on the course alone so there is minimal chance of hitting other cars.

The hardest part about autocross (aside from learning how to race) in my opinion is finding the right car. Sure, you can use a daily driver, but that is not recommended if you are going to participate in several events a year. Autocross can create wear on the tires and other components very quickly and can get expensive very fast. I would recommend to get a vehicle that you can use for autocross. This can be a “trailer car” or a car that you can still drive on the road, but use only for this hobby.

There are 4 key components to consider when selecting a car for autocross:

1) What type of car to get

2) The Price of the car

3) The overall condition of the vehicle (if used)

4) Aftermarket upgrades/modifications

WHAT TYPE OF CAR TO GET FOR AUTOCROSS:

For autocross racing, some people would assume that the car has to be very powerful, small, 2 doors and modified. This is not entirely accurate. While that type of car would be nice, it is not required to be competitive in autocross.

Remember that most autocross events and clubs have the cars grouped in to some sort of class. The club I participate with follow the SCCA Class guidelines. The classes help group the cars so the same “level” of vehicles can remain competitive within each class.

This is done to avoid the “biggest and fastest is best” state of thought. It would be unfair to put a heavily modified Porsche GT3 up against a stock Ford Focus. This is why they do that.

So, to pick the right car for autocross, you would probably want a coupe or convertible FIRST if possible. Sedans can work well too, but some sedans are not geared for modifications, although, the sport sedans of today are really starting to take over.

Manual transmission would be recommended, however, if you have an automatic that is OK too. You may want to consider trading it for a manual in the future to remain competitive. Again, there are still “sport shift” type automatics out there that are getting better and better each day.

Ideally, you would also want a rear-wheel drive car for autocross. RWD cars typically provide better control and handling in most cases. I know some enthusiasts out there will disagree with me, but that’s OK. On the other hand, I have used several front-wheel drive cars that run with the best of them.

PRICE:

The price of buying a car for autocross is always the factor for me. I, like many others, cannot afford an expensive vehicle for autocross. There are, however, those that can afford it and price is still something for them to consider.

The $0-$5000 range:

This is the range most of us beginners want to start. Of course, free is GOOD, but consider the 3rd component (overall condition) when this option comes to mind. Several cars that can perform well and have a lot of upgradable options are the following:

1989-1997 Mazda Miata – Very nice power to weight ratio. It is VERY popular at autocross. 1979-1991 Mazda RX7 – Fast small car, handles well. Many upgrades available. 1989-1998 Nissan 240sx – Several aftermarket upgrades, handles very well. 1990-1999 BMW 3 Series – Very versatile car. You can find very nice models in this range now. 1988-2000 Honda Civic/CRX – I have seen several models compete well in autocross. 1984-1999 Toyota MR2 – Low center of gravity, great performance, mid engine. 1990-1999 Mitsubishi Eclipse/Eagle Talon – Many upgrades, some models Turbo AWD. 2000-2007 Ford Focus – Very competitive cars. SVT models available in price range. 1997-2003 VW Golf – Hatchbacks always like autocross. VR6 models available in range. 1990-1999 Acura Integra – Like the Civic, very competitive with many upgrades out there.

There may be a few more cars that I missed that fall under this price range. The method I use to hunt for cars can vary depending on the type I am looking for. I will use local classified ads, Craigslist. I will also use the bigger car searches and expand my general “hunting” area. I have successfully found great cars using VEHIX, AutoTrader as well as Government Auction Sites.

But what about the autocross cars above the $5000 range? Well, I am glad you are think that because I am about to list them below.

If you have some money to work with and want to get something newer, you can consider the following cars:

The $5,001-$20,000 range:

This range can include newer cars as well as pre-owned cars that are no more than a few years old. Remember, cars usually depreciate very fast, so as the years go by, some of the newer cars can be within reach for less money and are great for autocross. The cars below come to mind in this range:

1998-Current Mazda MX-5 – Still same basic car, but more power as they got newer. 2003-Current VW Golf – Even more modified than the previous versions, compete well. 1992-1997 Mazda RX7 – 3rd Gen is twin-turbo and can compete in autocross. 1992-2006 BMW M3 – M3’s are designed for racing. Some newer models will fall in this range. 1998-2003 BMW M5 – M5’s are very powerful and compete in their class well. 1994-Current Ford Mustang/Cobra – Very versatile car. Competes well in class. 1994-2002 Camaro/Firebird – Competes well in class. Many autocross upgrades. 2007-Current Mazda Mazdaspeed3 – Turbo, hatchback, competes well in autocross. 2003-2008 Nissan 350z – Great autocross car, very popular on the track. Special Autocross Kit cars such as the V6 Stalker fall in this range as well.

Now, this price range can vary in vehicles. A lot of these cars are still new and may require loans to purchase them.

The $20,001 spectrum will consist of some of the current-day models as well as the obvious “super cars” we all respect such as the Corvette, Viper, Porsche, Ferrari, Lotus and others. I will not include a list for those because if you are buying one of those for an autocross car, you did your research.

OVERALL CONDITION OF THE VEHICLE (USED):

When buying a second car for autocross, treat it like when you are buying your daily driver car. You want the car to be relatively free of major problems. Autocross racing can put stress on the car’s frame, the suspension, the brakes, the tire and the overall body of the car.

You want to be sure that the car has not been in any major accidents. Frame repair or frame damage can be very dangerous mixture when you autocross. That is the MOST important thing to check for when buying a car for autocross. I have experienced and used the service by Experian called AutoCheck. They offer an unlimited number of VIN checks for one of their service options and the price is way better than the other services out there. I have used it when shopping and comes in very handy when you are checking the history of a vehicle.

The next important item to check on the car is major component problems such as smoke coming out of the back of the exhaust, major oil leaks (small leaks are expected on most used cars) slight/major overheating of the engine. Autocross is outside and you push the car to the limit. You want the major components to be in the best shape they can be. The mentioned problems can leave you stranded at the track if you do not look out for them.

I usually have some expectation to do minor repair or preventive repairs on my vehicles when I am buying to autocross them. As I stated above, small oil/fluid leaks are “OK” and can usually be fixed very easily. Small leaks tell us that the car is just used and may not be suffering from the leak as a result. Large/major leaks tell us the car may have been neglected by the previous owner and may carry residual problems unseen at the moment. When looking at a car, start it up, drive it around with the A/C engaged (even if it doesn’t work). When you are finished with the test drive, leave it idling while you walk around the car continuing to inspect it. If the car has an overheating problem, often this is the time it will show. This tip has helped me avoid several beautiful autocross cars that had an overheating problem.

Belts and hoses are my most frequent “preventive” repair I do, even if they are not a problem. It is always best to know when an important component has been replaced rather than to “guess” and trust the previous owner. Water pumps, too, fall in this category sometimes.

One thing people always check when buying a used car are the tires. Yes, this is important for an autocross car, but not to see how “good” the tires are, but to see if the car needs an alignment. Autocross is about handling and you need to be sure the car’s stock “handling” ability is where it should be.

Why not worry about the tires? Well, tires should be one thing to consider buying for your autocross car to begin with, so the existing tires should be removed anyway. Tires are probably the most bought wear item an autocross member will buy. A lot of autocross racers will bring a set of tires for racing, one for driving home (those who do not use a trailer) and some will even bring spares for the racing tires. This is so common that Tire Rack offers tires just for autocross. I have used them and they are the best place to get tires for this.

AFTERMARKET MODIFICATIONS FOR AUTOCROSS:

If you ever look into the aftermarket world of the auto industry, you know that there are literally thousands of places to look and buy. I will list a few spots that most people do not think to look, but surprisingly have things for the autocross fans.

First and foremost, autocross cars do NOT always need major upgrades to be competitive. A driver can use a stock vehicle and compete against fellow stock vehicles and remain competitive. Once you start to modify or upgrade heavily, you may start to move into different classes and compete with other cars that are equally modified. Keep that in mind when you want to change something.

Usually, I say modify the easy things first: Intake, exhaust and general tune ups. Most autocross drivers do not go far from that. These should be the first things you try to upgrade while you participate in autocross to get the most performance out of your vehicle.

If you decide to go further to be more competitive, my next recommendation would be suspension and body roll modifications. Please remember, certain upgrades in this area may change your class. Be sure to check your club or groups rules with these modifications.

Usually, the fastest upgrade to an autocross car would be front and rear strut tower bars/braces. They are usually inexpensive to buy and easy to install. They are also very modular meaning that when you buy these, they will work with other suspension components in place (usually). This modification helps stiffen the car’s suspension and frame and helps with cornering.

The next modification recommendation would then be the front and rear sway bars and links. These parts also help the body roll while cornering and handling and can sometimes be modular to the suspension system as a whole.

The final suspension upgrade is usually the most expensive: The struts (shocks/springs). This upgrade usually works well with the above items, but ads more stiffness, more response to the handling and sometimes lower the car overall for a lower center of gravity.

Once you have modified the entire suspension, my next recommendation would be to upgrade the brakes (at least the pads). This will help your stopping ability for those moments where a tap of the brake is needed during a lap. Please keep in mind that high performance brake pads usually wear much quicker than OEM.

One of the last things I recommend to upgrade is the tires. Now, I’m not saying that you should not FIRST buy new tires when you autocross, but I am saying not to UPGRADE them to an autocross/race tire just yet. Most autocross enthusiasts will tell you to get used to the stock/regular tires on your car first.

Once you get used to stock type tires, modifying them to a race tire or softer tire will actually improve your lap times (that’s the theory anyway).

One last note. I recommend replacing the fluids in your car with as many synthetics as you can. Synthetic fluids have higher heat resistance and can take the intense moments you will be putting on the car during the autocross laps.